The money can only be spent on programs that eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution and adapt Denver’s communities to a changing climate.

The specific ballot language reads – To be used to fund programs to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and adapt to climate change, including:

  • Job creation through local workforce training and new careers for under-resourced individuals in renewable and clean energy technology and management of natural resources;

  • Increased investments in solar power, battery storage and other renewable energy technology;  

  • Neighborhood-based environmental and climate justice programs;

  • Adaptation and resiliency programs that help vulnerable communities prepare for a changing climate;  

  • Programs and services that provide affordable, clean, safe and reliable transportation choices, like walking, biking, transit, electric vehicles, and neighborhood-scale transit; and  

  • Upgrade the energy efficiency of homes, offices and industry to reduce their carbon footprint, utility bills, and indoor air pollution;  

 

 

About 70% of sales tax revenue historically comes from visitors to Denver. For the average Denver household this sales tax is expected to cost $5 per month.

 

 

Shall city and county of Denver sales and use taxes be increased by $40.8 million annually, commencing January 1, 2021, and by whatever additional amounts are raised annually thereafter, from a twenty-five one10 hundredths of one percent (0.25%) sales and use tax rate (2.5 cents on a ten-dollar purchase) with exemptions for food, water, fuel, medical supplies, and feminine hygiene products, to be used to fund programs to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and adapt to climate change, including:  

  • Job creation through local workforce training and new careers for under-resourced individuals in renewable and clean energy technology and management of natural resources;  
  • Increased investments in solar power, battery storage and other renewable energy technology;  
  • Neighborhood-based environmental and climate justice programs; 
  • Adaptation and resiliency programs that help vulnerable communities prepare for a changing climate;  
  • Programs and services that provide affordable, clean, safe and reliable transportation choices, like walking, biking, transit, electric vehicles, and neighborhood-scale transit; and  
  • Upgrade the energy efficiency of homes, offices and industry to reduce their carbon footprint, utility bills, and indoor air pollution;

This dedicated funding should maximize investments in communities of color, under resourced communities, and communities most vulnerable to climate change and endeavor to invest 50% of the dedicated funds directly in community with a strong lens toward equity and race and social justice; the spending of funds will be overseen by the office of climate action, sustainability and resiliency and the citizen’s sustainability committee; all funds will be subject to an annual report available for public review; and requiring that revenues from these increased taxes shall be collected and spent without regard to any expenditure, revenue-raising, or other limitation contained within article x, section 20 of the Colorado Constitution or any other law?